Skip to main content

About your Search

20121205
20121213
STATION
KQED (PBS) 27
LANGUAGE
English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before panetta made his remarks to the information minister and he repeated one of their official positions, which
. the justices will also review a provision of the federal "defense of marriage act" or doma that deprives legally married gay couples of federal benefits that are available to heterosexual couples. same-sex marriage is legal or will be soon in nine states and the district of columbia. but 31 states have amended their constitutions to bar gay unions. here with us to explain today's development, and where it could lead, is marcia coyle of "the national law journal." welcome back, marcia. >> thanks, marg wet. >> warner: so is it fair to say first of all that the court's decision to hear these first two cases in itself a momentous decision? >> absolutely. a number of gay rights organizations, particularly as if relates to the federal defense of marriage act have been working towards that point. and yes, whatever the court says, if it reaches the merits of these cases will be extremely important. >> warner: let's take them one by one, prop 8 in california first. remind us briefly of how what started out as a state issue ended am in the supreme court. >> the california supreme court a number of
president george w. bush appointed him secretary of defense. president obama asked him to stay at the pentagon making him the first defense secretary to serve in both a republican and the democratic administration, he left his post in june, 2011. at his farewell ceremony president obama awarded him the presidential award of freedom. >> the highest honor. >> this is a man i have come to know and respect. a humble american patriot. a man of common sense and decency. quite simply one of our nation's finest public servants. >> rose: today the united states face as wave of foreign policy challenges, including the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose:
war is all basically who could get the other guy to leave the field first. >> trinity's defense is excellent in pursuit, and they never give up. ooh, hit hard there. they're going to push you and smash you in the mouth. oh! >> let's go, let's go. >> defense! >> they would hit us and hit us and hit us and hit us and hit us, and come back and hit us again. and some of our guys thought, "man, this is different than what i thought it was going to be." ( cheers and applause ) >> narrator: by halftime, shiloh trailed, 53 to 20. >> all right, listen, listen, we are all disappointed with that first half, okay. let me tell you something-- they're not going to quit. okay, you better play physical. do not cower down! you better not cower down. now's the time to fight more than ever. you understand me? >> yes, sir. >> i'm going to hurt you if you cower down. that's not who we are. >> come on, guys. >> defense! defense! >> narrator: the pounding continued in the second half of the game. >> jason is out there cramping. >> all right, get him over. late in the third quarter, shiloh's star defen
.s., the netherlands, and germany providing the weapons but the alliance stressed the move was defensive. >> the deployment of patriot missiles will serve as an effective deterrent and that way, diaz with the situation along the syrian-turkish border. >> russia is the one fly in the right man. the foreign minister said he would not block the move. a sign an old ally may be losing patience with president assaad. they hope deploying missiles will help stabilize tensions but the bigger concern is what is happening inside syria itself. specifically, what the regime might do with its stockpile of chemical weapons. syria has used much of its considerable arsenal to crush the rebellion. hidden from view it is believed to have developed a chemical weapons program and there are reports of activity, prompting this uncompromising western message. >> we are concerned for the same reason the united states has. we have sent our own clear, private message directly to them about the serious consequences that would follow from the use of such weapons. >> those consequences are not been spelled out and sy
, look what happens at the defense and other budget items being cut, at the prepared to do that in the end? >> well one of the, one of the, part of the white house proposals actually deferring the sequestration to tie that to another sort of trigger for an overhaul of the tax code to get tax reform done by the end of 2013. you know, it's like we haven't been talking that much about the sequester. i think there's a sense that even if we do get to january 1st. everyone talks about the fiscal cliff but it really is more like a slope, maybe a green bunny slope for when you go skiing, you know. it's not necessarily even a blubl black diamond because the thinking is that if you get there, that's going to be the impetus that both sides need to sit down and get a deal and ultimately it's going to mean republicans voting for a tax cut because rates will have risen for the maitle class and top earners. >> rose: you sound like a steer. >> well i would like to have a ski vacation this winter but i'm not sure anyone will be able to get out on the town. >> rose: one other question and
% of the city's economy is tied to defense spending. and in response to sea level rise, the navy has been replacing 14 piers at a cost of $35 million to $40 million apiece. >> sea level here is coming up for lots of reasons. there is no reason for it to go down. it just keeps coming up. >> reporter: larry atkinson heads the climate change and sea level rise institute at old dominion university. >> there is anecdotal evidence and there is real evidence that we have from the tide gauges we have. we can measure this. the science is simple. >> reporter: atkinson is part of a team of scientists the state of virginia has hired to study flooding. an early draft of the bill in the state assembly that funded the study drew criticism from some conservatives. the virginia tea party described the study on its website as: "more wasted tax dollars for more ridiculous studies designed to separate us from our money and control all land and water use." the final bill avoided the phrases sea level rise and climate change and won overwhelming bipartisan support this year. >> some people have tried to spin i
. the country's neighbor, turkey, received long-sought-after defense help from nato today. the military coalition also expressed growing concerns about the assad regime's chemical weapons supply. in an all too familiar scenes of civil war, rockets blasted and fires flared overseer i can't today. far from the fighting in brussels, nato members approved turkey's request for patriot antimissile systems. they will defend against syrian shelling and rocket fire that land on the turkish side. the issue has taken on greater urgency. amid u.s. warnings that syria could be preparing to use chemical weapons against the rebels. >> the syrian stock piles of chemical weapons are a matter of great concerns. we know that syria possesses... we know they have the chemical weapons. it is a matter of urgency to ensure effective defense and protection of our ally turkey. >> woodruff: nato chief also warned of even stronger action if the syrian government crosses the chemical line. echoing monday's statements by president obama. >> if anybody resorts to these terrible weapons, i would expect an immediate re
, was she a mother? >> gutted, shattered, heartbroken. >> their defense is that they never intended to cause any harm. >> it was never meant to go that far. it was meant to be a silly prank. so many people have done it before. >> the ethics of prank calls do not seem to trouble them. they said others had decided to broadcast them. >> there are people to make those decisions for us. >> did someone listen to that call? >> it went to the process of every other recording that we do. from interviews do anything at all. >> their struggling to cope with the unintended consequences of their actions -- they are struggling to cope with the unintended consequences of their actions. >> there is nothing that could make me feel worse than i do right now. we're so sorry. >> in london, that people who knew jacintha saldanha paid tribute to her humanity. >> she cared for my father at this time of need. she was a wonderful nurse. it is very disappointing to have lost her. >> the hospital repeated that she had not been reprimanded over the prank calls and pledged to do everything to help per family. the hospit
of defense. bill gates, a very good secretary of defense, -- bob gates said to me you need quickly to cultivate and devote time to relationships because you realize you're in this together. >> completely agree. and i would say if anything the pendulum is coming back hardener that direction. >> rose: meaning what? >> meaning coming out of the crisis. i think there's less trust in general. >> rose: it's part of the job in washington. so you value relationship very much and so there are hundreds of c.e.o.s that i know who i can pick up the phone and they trust g.e. and they trust g.e. because they know me or my team and i think that's immensely valuable and i think in the end it's important that business leaders and politicians have a better sense of trust than maybe what we've had over the last five years and, again, those things never work unless you assume you're 50% of the problem. that's what you've got to -- >> rose: assume you're 50% of the problem? in other words -- >> i'm not blameless. >> there's two kinds of advice you can give. this is what i try to do. one is here's what
is convinced assad will not go voluntarily, no matter what pressure is applied. meanwhile, u.s. defense secretary leon panetta said chances of the syrian regime resorting to chemical weapons may be easing. he spoke during a flight to kuwait. we have seen not seen anything new indicating any aggressive steps to move forward in that way, but we continue to monitor it very closely. we continue to make clear to them that they should not under any means make use of these chemical weapons against their own population. >> sreenivasan: also today, the united nations reported the number of syrian refugees fleeing the fighting has grown to more than 500,000, all across the middle east. and inside syria, rebels captured a second major military base near the northern city of aleppo. new details have emerged from south africa on the health of former president nelson mandela. the government announced today that military doctors are treating him for a recurring lung infection. mandela is 94 years old. he's been hospitalized since saturday, but officials said he is responding to treatment. an investiga
defense university and a former member of the syrian national council, the last major syrian political opposition group. and fred hof, who served as secretary of state clinton's special adviser for the syrian transition until last september. he is now a senior fellow at the atlantic council. ambassador hof, i want to start with you. how significant is what the president said yesterday about this recognition? >> gwen, first of all, i'm delighted to be here. i think what the president had to say was extraordinarily significant. we're coming to the point now where we may be at or very close to a tipping point in syria. where the assad regime may be in serious jeopardy of going down. nevertheless, there are still millions, literally millions, of syrians on the fence. they have no illusions about the corruption, the incompetence, the brutality of this regime. but they do wonder what's next. recognizing this organization, making it clear that there is international support for it gives these syrians an opportunity to see what's next. >> ifill: murhaf jouejati, do you think it's significant?
's ban on same-sex marriage and the federal defense of marriage act. paul, we'll begin with you. what can we infer from this? what's the time frame? can we expect any sweeping judgments? >> well, a timeframe is the arguments are going to happen in march then we expect a decision by the end of the court session which is june 27th. it will probably go right to the very end. as for how sweeping and how big of a decision we can expect, that's sort of the $64,000 question that court watchers were already speculating about today. are we going to get a narrow ruling one way or another on either one of these two cases or is it going to be one of those once in a generation social civil rights type cases like roe v. wade or brown v.s. board of education? and i think nobody knows. >> how much attention do you think they give to that, to public opinion? where the public stands on an issue? and growing sentiment? >> it's a great question. i mean, if you look at the evolving public opinion on this, there were polls in 2004 that were taken by gallup and "washington post" and other people that showed abo
, but mr. panetta, secretary of defense, actually is in the act saying there would be retaliation, do you believe that? and what would be the consequences of that? >> i think everybody believes that. and i think the deputy foreign minister believes it, too. which is why the key phrase there was we wouldn't commit suicide. he knows that if they use these weapons, that there would be a massive retaliation on the part of the united states. and i don't think we should undermine his credibility just because he said "if." take israel for instance, doesn't admit it has nuclear weapons. that's accepted. >> you think rather than us, nato would be interested in getting involved? >> i think pat is right that if they use those weapons, they would be completely isolated. and it would be a coalition of everyone across the globe. >> nato forces, you got the turks there and the americans. the americans have the air power. and the israelis in the neighborhood have it, but they don't want to get involved or shouldn't get involved. but only the americans could do that, and frankly, i don't think we could bl
, the secretary of defense, secretary of state, and others in that room. why? >> well again i think what was interesting to us the people at the heart of this hunt, people on the ground, people in pakistan, the people you know with surveillance just good old fashion. whatever means they were utilizing, you know, what, peel back the curtain and show an audience what it would be like to be at the center of this operation. >> besides, you've seen that photo. you really want to see it again. >> rose: well i do but that's just me. i want to know what the president might have said in that room. >> that will be another movie. >> if you do that and it's denzel washington or some other great actor playing the president you say that's not right, that's not really him. >> rose: because you know them. >> you know them. >> rose: you didn't want to go back and use footage. >> it's also, there's a certain narrative imperative when you tell a story through one person's eyes that you sort of try to channel the audience through that character. >> it breaks the immediacy of it. we're almost in real time
and me nothing on our savings and checking accounts they say in their own defense, we're dealing with unprecedented regulation. we have to curb proprietary trading. we have regulators breathing down our neck and it's hard to earn an extra buck in that environment. you're seeing citi, in fact, address those concerns in the layoff announcement today. >> ifill: what does that tell bus the health of the banking sector and whether other big banking institution might be following suit? >> citigroup is not as mump an indicator species as i think people would want it to be. 15 years ago, it was the financial supermarket. it rolled everything together. it's one-stop shopping, and that mold has been called into question, not least by the architect of this model, sandy wiel, saying we should break up the big banks. gwen, i think it tells us more about the end of the era of kind of this force conglomeration of bank where's bigger is naturally better. you have seen, obviously, too big to fail banks become too bigger to fail, such as j.p.morgan, or wells fargo which bought wachovia. but there
in the world market? >> bill, do you know where i heard that exact same explanation, defense? i heard it when wall street wanted deregulation. "we have to be competitive in the entire global economy. let's deregulate wall street so we can compete internationally." i don't believe that for a second. look, the issue is we live in a country where millions of people really have not had the opportunity to learn about the dynamics of what goes on in american society. major, major issues literally, get very, very little discussion. so the bottom line for the fcc has got to be, "how do we create a situation in which the american people are hearing a diverse range of ideas so that our public world has the kind of debate that it needs?" >> but what about the argument that people make that the internet, the thriving of the internet, let a billion opinions bloom diminishes the tyranny of monopoly? >> let me respond to that in two ways. "a," the internet is enormously important. it is growing. but the bottom line is that most people today still get their information from television and from radio. >> 74%,
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)